GO
Toll Free800-641-5990
Steel Workers

News

Did you know

First | Prev | Page 1 / 1 | Next | Last

5 Things You Need to Know About Asbestos

Posted 3:36 PM by

 

5 Things You Need to Know About Asbestos

Even though you may not always see it, asbestos still exists in many old houses and buildings. It is important to be knowledgeable and take proper precautions against this deadly toxin. Read on for five important facts you need to know about asbestos.

 

1.     Many products still legally contain asbestos. These products are mostly used in the construction industry, and may exist in new structures. Asbestos is used to make products resistant to heat. Asbestos is commonly used as an acoustic insulator and a thermal insulator, as well as in fireproofing and building materials. It is also sprayed on structural steel beams, in crawlspaces, and between walls.  Today, products such as ceiling tiles, vinyl sheet flooring, roofing shingles, acoustical plaster, electrical wiring insulation, caulking, spackling, adhesives, chalkboards, fire blankets, elevator equipment panels, and thermal paper products all include asbestos.

 

2.     Asbestos becomes hazardous only when it is disturbed and the fibers become airborne. If an asbestos-containing substance is easily crumbled or pulverized with hand pressure, the material is called “friable.” Friable asbestos can become airborne and then enter your lungs when you breathe, leading to disease. Friable substances include the fibrous, fluffy, sprayed-on materials used in insulation, fireproofing, and soundproofing. Non-friable materials, such as floor tile and roofing felt, usually do not emit airborne fibers. The danger to you comes from drilling, cutting, sanding, or disturbing materials that contain asbestos. If you are renovating your home, make sure you have licensed professionals carry out the work according to certain specifications and safety protocols. Do not try to discard asbestos on your own.

 

 

SRI safety consultant Scott Powell takes proper procautions by wearing necessary personal protective equipment (PPE) during a recent asbestos awareness class. 

 

3.     It could take decades before you notice symptoms related to asbestos exposure. Asbestos is a carcinogen, and may lead to one or more diseases in those who have inhaled its microscopic fibers. Some common asbestos-related diseases are asbestosis and mesothelioma. The longer you are exposed, the greater the risk becomes for you to develop an asbestos-related disease. Asbestosis is a noncancerous, but chronic, and often fatal respiratory disease that occurs after asbestos fibers cause scarring in the lungs. The scarring can cause pain, difficulty breathing, and heart problems. Mesothelioma is a rare form of cancer that is diagnosed in roughly 3,000 Americans each year. It causes a tumor that spreads across the tissue in and around the lungs. Asbestos exposure is accountable for virtually all cases of mesothelioma. These diseases may take up to 40 or 50 years to develop within the body, making many victims of these diseases unaware of their condition.

 

4.     Asbestos fibers remain in the human body once they are inhaled or ingested. Unlike many toxins, asbestos cannot be “flushed out.” Because asbestos fibers are microscopic, the fibers can slip through the lungs’ natural filtration system and penetrate outwardly through the membrane which covers the lungs and lines the chest cavity. The fibers can also be swallowed and penetrate the stomach. Unfortunately, nothing can remove the fibers from the body due to their sharp, needle-like nature. To protect yourself, wear the appropriate respiratory protection and necessary personal protective equipment when in contact with asbestos.

 

5.     Asbestos is still mined and exported in other countries. Despite its health hazards, asbestos is a commodity in countries such as Greece, Canada, Russia, Italy, China, and India. Many of these countries also continue to use and market asbestos widely. Due to asbestos being a low-cost substance, it has become common on construction sites in developing countries.

 

Source: Asbestos.net

 

 

link

Did You Know All of These House Fire Statistics?

Posted 5:12 PM by



House fires, and the harm they cause are more common than you think. Make sure you are taking proper precautions at home and in the workplace. 

link

OSHA's Top 10 Cited Violations Revealed

Posted 5:43 PM by

OSHA just released a list of their most cited 2017 violations and some of them may surprise you. 2017 saw a decrease in electrical violations and an increase in fall protection violations from 2016. 

 

 

 

link

Do you know where your utility installations are located? Knowing can save your life

Posted 4:26 PM by

The Importance of Utility Locates

By: Neil Spaeth, Safety Consultant

About Utilities

On a continual basis, utilities are involved in a vast majority of construction related activities including, but not limited to: excavation and trenching, the use of material handling equipment, crane lifts, and demolition. Per OSHA’s Excavation standard, 29 CFR 1926 Subpart P, employers are required to:

- Determine the approximate location(s) of utility installations — including sewer, telephone, fuel, electric, and water lines. One common industry practice is to call 8-1-1, the “Call Before You Dig” number, to establish the location of any underground utility installations in the work area.

 

- Contact and notify the utility companies or owners involved to inform them of the proposed work within established or customary local response times.

 

- Ask the utility companies or owners to establish the location of underground installations prior to the start of excavation work. If they cannot respond within 24 hours (unless the period required by state or local law is longer) or cannot establish the exact location of the utility installations, employers may proceed with caution, which includes using detection equipment or other acceptable means to locate utility installations.

 

- Determine the exact location of underground installations by safe and acceptable means when excavation operations approach the approximate location of the installations.

 

- Ensure that while the excavation is open, underground installations are protected, supported, or removed as necessary in order to safeguard workers.

 

The Dangers of Not Knowing Utility Locations

Due to the continual efforts of improving or renovating existing properties, a number of hazards can present themselves if existing utility locations are not known prior to beginning work. This includes but is not limited to electrocution caused from underground electrical conduit and natural gas released into the atmosphere and surrounding work crews. In fact, if an operator or work crew is instructed to dig in an area in which utility locations are not known, the operator can subject themselves to an unexpected reaction leading to equipment failure or unstable soil.

 

In recent years, OSHA has stated that one of the leading causes of excavation or trenching related injuries is not providing a protective system. This includes pre-planning involving the location of nearby utilities. 

 

 

                                                  

 

Methods of Protection

        Locate Utilities

811 is an available resource with an office in each state. With proper pre-planning, 811 can provide services to locate the approximate location of each utility.

        Plan, Plan, Plan

Prior to beginning work, develop a site specific safety plan outlining each step including: locating each utility, digging methods, spotting and communication efforts. After this is developed, a good plan of action is to communicate this plan with the work crew prior to each day’s digging activities.

        Never Assume

A best practice to communicate to your work crews, particularly when dealing with utilities, is to ensure that the prior steps are being taken to protect each worker. This might include a company-specific practice involving Lockout / Tagout strategies, or the utilization of monitoring equipment while on the job site.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

The importance of workers donning personnel protective equipment (PPE) takes on an added dimension with the threat from hidden utilities on the jobsite. Many manufacturing facility managers, owners, and employees are unaware of the fire hazards from combustible dust. These hazards are found in environments where workers can sustain life-threatening burns from natural gas explosions, flash fires, electrocution, and flying particle hazards related to pressurized equipment. PPE is a necessary precaution and strategy used as an added layer of protection. The most useful strategy in selecting the correct PPE is to conduct a workplace job hazard analysis of each job title to ensure each hazard is known, evaluated, and prevented.


 

link

Nationwide Consulting

Posted 7:17 PM by

Did you know we offer consulting nationwide? One of our consultants captured some great photos while he was working with one of our clients in Portland, OR. 

For a list of services we offer nationwide, visit: http://www.safetyresources.com/services-page .


 

link

Friday Factoid- July 14, 2017

Posted 2:09 PM by



Make sure you are preventing yourself and those around you from heat-related illnesses this summer and year-round! 

link

A Change in OSHA's Monorail Hoists Policy

Posted 8:22 PM by

http://ehstoday.com/construction/osha-announces-policy-change-monorail-hoists
 

link

Firework Safety: The Safe Way to Have a Blast

Posted 7:21 PM by

Firework Safety

The Safe Way to Have a Blast

 

Did you know that the smallest and simplest of fireworks, such as sparklers can burn at 1200 degrees Fahrenheit? With the 4th of July quickly approaching, we know that many of you will be purchasing, lighting, or watching fireworks. It is important to know the dangers fireworks possess and ways to prevent an accident from occurring.

According to the National Fire Protection Association, fireworks cause 18,500 reported fires each year and cause an annual average of three deaths, 40 injuries, and $43 million in property damage. Most injuries are to the hand or finger and involve people between the ages of 25-44.

There is a safe way to have fun this Independence Day. See below for a list of tips to follow from the National Council on Fireworks Safety.    

  • Use fireworks outdoors in a clear area and away from buildings and vehicles.
  • If you are not familiar with the proper way to light fireworks, do not light fireworks at all. Leave this to the professionals.
  • Before igniting a firework, read the cautionary labels and performance descriptions on the box.
  • Never give fireworks to children. All firework activities should be supervised by an adult.
  • Alcohol and fireworks should not be mixed.
  • Wear safety glasses when shooting fireworks.
  • Light one firework at a time and then quickly move away.
  • Never shoot fireworks of any kind near pets.
  • If you are bringing your pet to a public firework display, make sure your pet has an identification tag, in case it runs off during the show.
  • Never relight a “dud” firework.  Wait 20 minutes and then soak it in a bucket of water.
  • In case of a fire, always have a bucket of water and charged water hose nearby.
  • Never carry fireworks in your pocket or shoot them into metal or glass containers.
  • Do not experiment with homemade fireworks.
  • Dispose of fireworks by wetting them down and place in a metal trash can away from any building or combustible materials until the next day.
  • Report illegal explosives, like M-80s and quarter sticks, to the fire or police department.
  • Remember, FAA regulations prohibit the possession and transportation of fireworks in checked baggage or carry-on luggage.
link

It's a Hot One Out There! How to Avoid Heat-Related Illnesses

Posted 6:59 PM by

 

It’s a Hot One Out There! How to Avoid Heat-Related Illnesses

June 2017

 

 

As we enter the summer months, it is important that workers are aware of the risk of heat-related hazards and injuries. Those who are at the greatest risk of heart stress are generally over the age of 65, have a heart-related medical condition, are overweight and have high blood pressure. The summer months are the portion of the year that nearly everyone looks forward to most; however, with the increased temperature comes an increased risk for people experiencing heat-related illnesses. Heat-related illnesses include a variety of conditions that arise from exposure to high-temperatures, direct sunlight, humidity and lack of hydration. Heat stroke, heat exhaustion and heat cramps and the most serious forms of heat-related illness. Each of these conditions is caused by exposure to heat and carries with it a variety of symptoms.

                                                                                                                                                    

Heat stroke occurs when the body loses the ability to properly maintain a normal core body temperature. During heat stroke, the body’s temperature can rise to levels as high as 106° F and may result in fatality or permanent disability without proper medical treatment. Symptoms of heat stroke include hot, dry skin, profuse sweating, hallucinations, chills, headaches, confusion and slurred speech.

 

Heat exhaustion is the body’s response to large losses of water and salt from sweating. A worker experiencing heat exhaustion has similar symptoms as heat stroke. If a worker is suspected of having heat stroke or heat exhaustion, 911 should be called immediately to provide proper medical care.

 

Heat cramps, like heat exhaustion, are caused by losing large amounts of water quickly which results in painful muscular cramps. Although this condition is less severe than heat stroke and heat exhaustion, it is uncomfortable and still requires the employee to be removed from the hot environment and begin rehydrating with fluids. A worker experiencing heat cramps should not return to work for a few hours after the cramps subside.

 

Preventative measures to reduce and control the frequency of heat-related illness should be discussed and reviewed with your team at the beginning of the warm season. Preventative measures include:

 

1) Selecting appropriate clothing that will keep the body cool. Light colored, loose-fitting, cotton (or other breathable material) should be worn.

 

2) Begin hydration before outdoor work and repeat often. Drink enough water so that thirst is not experienced. Drinking about 1-cup of water every 15-20 minutes will help prevent dehydration.

 

3) While working outdoors, take breaks often while the body adjusts to the heat.

 

4) Pay attention to weather reports and schedule work around cooler parts of the day.

 

 

5) Stick to the Buddy System. It’s essential to monitor your own physical condition as well as that    of your coworkers. Having a designated person check in with workers to monitor signs and symptoms of heat related illness and provide cool water will help to reduce the frequency and severity of heat related illness.

 

 

 

Sources:

 

https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/heatstress/default.html

http://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/prolonged-exposure-to-heat-cho/26887488

 

https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=NEWS_RELEASES&p_id=26052

 

http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/heatstress/

 

https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatstress/heat_illnesses.html

 

 

link

What is wrong with these two pictures? Common Safety Mistakes

Posted 3:12 PM by



Photo by Edge Protection Solutions 

Photo by: Suresh Gopal 

Can you spot the common safety mistakes in these two pictures? Safety mishaps in the areas of fall protection and scaffolding are prevalent in the construction industry. It is important that certain procautions are utilized to avoid injury and/or death on a jobsite. 

In the top photo you will notice that the workers aren't using any kind of fall protection. Safety harnesses, nets, and guard rails are essential in avoiding a fall. According to OSHA standards, fall protection is required when work is being performed more than six feet above the ground. It is important for everyone on the jobsite to understand the fall protection basics and to put them to practice when necessary.

In the bottom photo you will notice an example of poor scaffolding. A section of scaffolding is barely balancing on a small piece of wood instead of being secured. When setting up, scaffolding should be plumb, level and stable.OSHA requires that scaffolds be designed by a qualified person and be inspected at least once each work shift by a competent person. Stationary scaffolds over 125 feet in height and rolling scaffolds over 60 feet in height must be designed by a professional engineer.

link

Did you know? Fall Protection Systems

Posted 1:54 PM by

Did you know?

These roofers are cutting a hole in the roof to create a skylight. There are multiple fall protection systems that are being used, PFAS, warning line systems, and a safety monitor, to help keep all employees safe and free from fall hazards.

Fall Protection


 

link
First | Prev | Page 1 / 1 | Next | Last

 


Click here to request a free in-depth quote or use our contact form to request more information about the safety consulting and training services that we provide.

Or, call us: 800-641-5990.
Sign-up for our Safety Newsletters

Copyright © 1995 - 2011 Safety Resources, Inc. - "Safety Consulting and Training Services since 1995" | 12 W. Vermont Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 46204 | 800-641-5990
Powered by Marketpath CMS