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It's a Hot One Out There! How to Avoid Heat-Related Illnesses

Posted 6:59 PM by

 

It’s a Hot One Out There! How to Avoid Heat-Related Illnesses

June 2017

 

 

As we enter the summer months, it is important that workers are aware of the risk of heat-related hazards and injuries. Those who are at the greatest risk of heart stress are generally over the age of 65, have a heart-related medical condition, are overweight and have high blood pressure. The summer months are the portion of the year that nearly everyone looks forward to most; however, with the increased temperature comes an increased risk for people experiencing heat-related illnesses. Heat-related illnesses include a variety of conditions that arise from exposure to high-temperatures, direct sunlight, humidity and lack of hydration. Heat stroke, heat exhaustion and heat cramps and the most serious forms of heat-related illness. Each of these conditions is caused by exposure to heat and carries with it a variety of symptoms.

                                                                                                                                                    

Heat stroke occurs when the body loses the ability to properly maintain a normal core body temperature. During heat stroke, the body’s temperature can rise to levels as high as 106° F and may result in fatality or permanent disability without proper medical treatment. Symptoms of heat stroke include hot, dry skin, profuse sweating, hallucinations, chills, headaches, confusion and slurred speech.

 

Heat exhaustion is the body’s response to large losses of water and salt from sweating. A worker experiencing heat exhaustion has similar symptoms as heat stroke. If a worker is suspected of having heat stroke or heat exhaustion, 911 should be called immediately to provide proper medical care.

 

Heat cramps, like heat exhaustion, are caused by losing large amounts of water quickly which results in painful muscular cramps. Although this condition is less severe than heat stroke and heat exhaustion, it is uncomfortable and still requires the employee to be removed from the hot environment and begin rehydrating with fluids. A worker experiencing heat cramps should not return to work for a few hours after the cramps subside.

 

Preventative measures to reduce and control the frequency of heat-related illness should be discussed and reviewed with your team at the beginning of the warm season. Preventative measures include:

 

1) Selecting appropriate clothing that will keep the body cool. Light colored, loose-fitting, cotton (or other breathable material) should be worn.

 

2) Begin hydration before outdoor work and repeat often. Drink enough water so that thirst is not experienced. Drinking about 1-cup of water every 15-20 minutes will help prevent dehydration.

 

3) While working outdoors, take breaks often while the body adjusts to the heat.

 

4) Pay attention to weather reports and schedule work around cooler parts of the day.

 

 

5) Stick to the Buddy System. It’s essential to monitor your own physical condition as well as that    of your coworkers. Having a designated person check in with workers to monitor signs and symptoms of heat related illness and provide cool water will help to reduce the frequency and severity of heat related illness.

 

 

 

Sources:

 

https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/heatstress/default.html

http://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/prolonged-exposure-to-heat-cho/26887488

 

https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=NEWS_RELEASES&p_id=26052

 

http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/heatstress/

 

https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatstress/heat_illnesses.html

 

 

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What is wrong with these two pictures? Common Safety Mistakes

Posted 3:12 PM by



Photo by Edge Protection Solutions 

Photo by: Suresh Gopal 

Can you spot the common safety mistakes in these two pictures? Safety mishaps in the areas of fall protection and scaffolding are prevalent in the construction industry. It is important that certain procautions are utilized to avoid injury and/or death on a jobsite. 

In the top photo you will notice that the workers aren't using any kind of fall protection. Safety harnesses, nets, and guard rails are essential in avoiding a fall. According to OSHA standards, fall protection is required when work is being performed more than six feet above the ground. It is important for everyone on the jobsite to understand the fall protection basics and to put them to practice when necessary.

In the bottom photo you will notice an example of poor scaffolding. A section of scaffolding is barely balancing on a small piece of wood instead of being secured. When setting up, scaffolding should be plumb, level and stable.OSHA requires that scaffolds be designed by a qualified person and be inspected at least once each work shift by a competent person. Stationary scaffolds over 125 feet in height and rolling scaffolds over 60 feet in height must be designed by a professional engineer.

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Yummmmm

Posted 5:37 PM by

Great lunch today with the Indianapolis Roofers Safety Group! Whenever Olive Garden is involved, it's a good time. 

 

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An important message from our president Kristin VanSoest on the recent change in OSHA's electronic reporting rule

Posted 4:20 PM by

http://mailchi.mp/safetyresources/osha-electronic-reporting-rule-suspended

 

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Happy Birthday, Jeff!!!

Posted 4:14 PM by


Happy birthday to our stylish safety consultant Jeff Stoll! We hope you had a great day and enjoyed your 30th birthday party:) 
 

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Confined Spaces in Construction

Posted 7:42 PM by
An educational confined space article from one of our safety consultants
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We Escaped!

Posted 1:16 PM by

We had a great time at our team building event this past Friday.

What a neat venue, The Escape Room Indy.

Escape Room Indy

 

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The Races of Man at Holliday Park

Posted 7:45 PM by

Safety work being performed by our client in the background of the Races of Man at Holliday Park.

History of the Races of Man

Holliday Park
 

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ISA Networking Event of the Year 2016

Posted 3:13 PM by

Construction Networking Event of the Year

               ISA 2016

 

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Senior Living Construction

Posted 7:36 PM by

“What you do you do with an old gymnasium?  Convert it into senior Living.”



 

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In the Field - Soldiers and Sailors Monumnet

Posted 7:31 PM by

Working safely from suspended scaffold with the reflection of “Liberty” overseeing the work from atop of the Soldiers and Sailors Monument.



 

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In the Field - Sands School Cincinnati

Posted 1:34 PM by

Rehabilitation ongoing at the old Sands School in Cincinnati.

Soon to be a senior living complex in Spring of 2016.

Cincinnati OH aerial lift

 

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2015 Project of the Year

Posted 9:15 PM by

Congratulations to TWG Construction, LLC. on the Safety Resources, Inc. 2015 Project of the Year for Penn Street Tower.

Safety Award

 

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Christmas Party 2015

Posted 8:38 PM by

It's always a blast at our annual Christmas party. Gag gifts, white elephant gifts, games and a pitch-in. Oh! And of course, the ugly Christmas sweater contest.

 


 

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Overlooking the Circle

Posted 3:45 PM by

In the field, overlooking Indianapolis's beautiful circle.

Indianapolis CirclePhoto Credit: Tim Foulks

 

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